The world during the COVID-19 pandemic from the points of view of individuals with autism and ADHD and their families

View our Duke Autism Center COVID Art Show here

 

We welcome new artwork! Please email us your artwork - simple drawing, lavish painting, or photo of your 3D art - All are welcome! Email autismresearch@duke.edu.

Questions? Email catherine.jarboe@duke.edu.

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Our Directors Invite Artists of all Ages

All of us have had our world turned upside down from the coronavirus pandemic.  Whether it’s job changes or insecurity, sheltering at home, interacting with people solely through the internet, or being directly affected by the virus through exposure or illness.  But, for people with autism, ADHD, and other developmental differences, the pandemic has had unique consequences.  For example, comforting daily routines and cherished foods and activities have been disrupted without warning or proper support.  Learning, employment, and a wide range of therapeutic activities that require the substantial support of teachers and trained professionals are difficult, if not impossible, to achieve at home. Families worry about the impact of the loss of employment and appropriate education on their loved one’s current and long-term functioning. The uncertainty and confusion caused by the pandemic can increase feelings of anxiety, which already are a common challenge among persons with developmental differences.

Many people with autism and other developmental differences find it difficult to express their feelings in words, so it can be hard for others to understand how the current situation is being experienced by those with developmental differences.  The purpose of this project was to give “voice” to those with autism, ADHD, and other developmental challenges, and their families.  What is the world like during the COVID-19 pandemic from their points of view?  We asked them, “What makes you happy, sad, or angry?” With their permission we solicited, and now share with you, artistic creations of individuals with ASD, ADHD, and their siblings across the lifespan, from young children to adults.  We invite you to enjoy these creations and thank all who chose to participate.  Please note that some creations express strong feelings of fear and anxiety. 

Sincerely yours,

Dr. Geraldine Dawson
Director, Duke Center for Autism and Brain Development

Dr. Scott Kollins
Director, Duke ADHD Program

"Healthcare Friend" by DJ Svoboda

 

We have created a slide show featuring the submissions that we receive and will be updating it as we continue to receive artwork submissions. You can see the slide show here. A pdf version is available here.